Security Lessons from Drug Trials

by adam on December 15, 2014

When people don’t take their drugs as prescribed, it’s for very human reasons.

Typically they can’t tolerate the side effects, the cost is too high, they don’t perceive any benefit, or they’re just too much hassle.

Put these very human (and very subjective) reasons together, and they create a problem that medicine refers to as non-adherence. It’s an awkward term that describes a daunting problem: about 50% of people don’t take their drugs as prescribed, and this creates some huge downstream costs. Depending how you count it, non-adherence racks up between $100 billion and $280 billion in extra costs – largely due to a condition worsening and leading to more expensive treatments down the line.

So writes “Getting People To Take Their Medicine.” But Thomas Goetz is not simply griping about the problem, he’s presenting a study of ways to address it.

That’s important because we in information security also ask people to do things, from updating their software to trusting certain pixels and not other visually identical pixels, and they don’t do those things, also for very human reasons.

His conclusion applies almost verbatim to information security:

So we took especial interest in the researcher’s final conclusion: “It is essential that researchers stop re-inventing the poorly performing ‘wheels’ of adherence interventions.” We couldn’t agree more. It’s time to stop approaching adherence as a clinical problem, and start engaging with it as a human problem, one that happens to real people in their real lives. It’s time to find new ways to connect with people’s experiences and frustrations, and to give them new tools that might help them take what the doctor ordered.

If only information security’s prescriptions were backed by experiments as rigorous as clinical trials.

(I’ve previously shared Thomas Goetz’s work in “Fear, Information Security, and a TED Talk“)

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