Transparency: When Security Pros Get Popped

by David Mortman on January 7, 2014

Rich Mogul over at Securosis (N.B. I’m a contributing analyst there) has a great post on how, due to human error, some of his AWS credentials got nabbed by some miscreants and abused. We here at the New School love it when folks share how they were compromised and what they did about it. It is this sort of transparency that helps us all. Kudos to Rich for being willing to share his pain for our benefit.

4 comments

I completely agree! We need this level of transparency or the true impact of incidents and the sheer scale of them will always remain an ‘unknown’. Traditionally this has been borne out of fear but I hope the tide has turned on this and companies (and individuals) will begin to be more honest about the breaches and incidents they have learnt.

by Gary Hibberd on January 10, 2014 at 8:41 am. Reply #

Hello David

I’ve noticed over the years of teaching and consulting on data security that getting hard stats on security breaches is never an easy task. I think that the more businesses share this type of information the more organisations will start to get a real sense of the threats they may be unaware off, or even close their eyes to.

by Andy Reed on January 13, 2014 at 1:34 pm. Reply #

Even if not public transparency there should be transparency between professionals and as a minimum with professionals in the same sector. A great deal can be learnt in relation to industry specific incidents and subsequently tackling as a group as opposed to individual approach.

by Stuart Barker on January 16, 2014 at 1:18 pm. Reply #

We here at the New School love it when folks share how they were compromised and what they did about it!!!

by Camere de supraveghere on January 24, 2014 at 11:52 am. Reply #

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